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Last Updated: Jan 27, 2017 URL: http://classguides.lib.uconn.edu/writingcenter Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

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Working with Quotes

There are two steps to quoting a source:

1. ACKNOWLEDGE that the quote has been borrowed from another source, and

2. CREDIT the source and its author(s).

Direct quote: "The experience left him with ecstatic memories of communion with the sea and keen insights into the life of men at sea that later found frequent expression in his plays" (Stilling).

Works Cited (MLA)

Stilling, Roger J. "O' Neill, Eugene." Dictionary of Literary Biography Vol. 331: Nobel Prize Laureates in Literature, Part 3: Lagerkvist-Pontoppidan. Gale, 2007. Literature Resource Center. Web. 25 Jan. 2010.

 

Common Knowledge

The information may be considered common knowledge if it can be verified in a variety of sources.

ex. Eugene O' Neill was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1936. [common knowledge]

ex. O' Neill educated himself using the works of Nietzsche, Wilde, and Baudelaire (Stilling). [must be cited]

Stilling, Roger J. "O' Neill, Eugene." Dictionary of Literary Biography Vol. 331: Nobel Prize Laureates in Literature, Part 3: Lagerkvist-Pontoppidan. Gale, 2007. Literature Resource Center. Web. 25 Jan. 2010.

ex. August Strindberg was born in Stockholm. [common knowledge]

ex. In The Son of a Servant, Strindberg's anti-feminist stance may be located in the depiction of the author's parents ("Strindberg"). [must be cited]

"(Johan) August Strindberg." Contemporary Authors Online. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Literature Resource Center. Web. 26 Jan. 2010.

 

Plagiarism

"Plagiarism involves using another's work without attribution, as if it were one's own original work. It is considered an ethical offense and can be detrimental to one's academic reputation and integrity" ("Plagiarism vs. Copyright").

"Plagiarism vs. Copyright infringement." Copyright. University of Connecticut Libraries, 2009. Web. 1 Nov. 2009.

RefWorks can simplify the citation process. RefWorks is management software that will automatically cite your research in MLA and create bibliographic lists.

 

Paraphrasing

Use the material in your own words and be sure to credit the author(s).

Direct quote: "A common motif in Euripidean plays is an appeal to a god for mercy, coupled with a reminder that gods should have higher standards of morality than men" (Knox 321).

Paraphrase: In Euripides' drama there is an expectation of moral superiority in divine beings. Euripides' characters will often plead to the gods for clemency (Knox 321).

Works Cited

Knox, B.M.W. "Euripides." Cambridge History of Classical Literature Vol. 1: Greek Literature. Eds. P.E. Easterling and B.M.W. Knox. Cambridge UP, 1985. 316-339. Print.

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